Dimitris Kammenos, notorious for anti-Semitic and  homophobic remarks, often peddled a conspiracy theory claiming that 2,500 Jews  employed in New York’s World Trade Centre “skipped work” on the day of the  September 11, 2001 attacks (below). Photo:  AFP
Dimitris Kammenos, notorious for anti-Semitic and  homophobic remarks, often peddled a conspiracy theory claiming that 2,500 Jews  employed in New York’s World Trade Centre “skipped work” on the day of the  September 11, 2001 attacks (below). Photo:  AFP
Dimitris Kammenos, notorious for anti-Semitic and homophobic remarks, often peddled a conspiracy theory claiming that 2,500 Jews employed in New York’s World Trade Centre “skipped work” on the day of the September 11, 2001 attacks (below). Photo: AFP

Cabinet crackpot: 9/11 conspiracy theorist quits after one day as Greek minister

Dimitris Kammenos, notorious for anti-Semitic and  homophobic remarks, often peddled a conspiracy theory claiming that 2,500 Jews  employed in New York’s World Trade Centre “skipped work” on the day of the  September 11, 2001 attacks (below). Photo:  AFP
Dimitris Kammenos, notorious for anti-Semitic and  homophobic remarks, often peddled a conspiracy theory claiming that 2,500 Jews  employed in New York’s World Trade Centre “skipped work” on the day of the  September 11, 2001 attacks (below). Photo:  AFP
Dimitris Kammenos, notorious for anti-Semitic and homophobic remarks, often peddled a conspiracy theory claiming that 2,500 Jews employed in New York’s World Trade Centre “skipped work” on the day of the September 11, 2001 attacks (below). Photo: AFP
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