An artist’s concept of the so-called Kepler-1658 system, observed by the Kepler telescope. The planet and its sun, which are not in our solar system, are helping scientists understand more about Earth. Photo: Gabriel Perez Diaz/Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias
An artist’s concept of the so-called Kepler-1658 system, observed by the Kepler telescope. The planet and its sun, which are not in our solar system, are helping scientists understand more about Earth. Photo: Gabriel Perez Diaz/Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias
Space

Planet spiralling into star may offer glimpse of Earth’s end

  • Astronomers have, for the first time, identified a planet, outside our own solar system, that could be on course to collide with its ageing sun
  • Researchers hope doomed Kepler-1658b will help them understand how worlds die; ‘death-by-star … could be Earth’s ultimate adios billions of years from now’

An artist’s concept of the so-called Kepler-1658 system, observed by the Kepler telescope. The planet and its sun, which are not in our solar system, are helping scientists understand more about Earth. Photo: Gabriel Perez Diaz/Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias
An artist’s concept of the so-called Kepler-1658 system, observed by the Kepler telescope. The planet and its sun, which are not in our solar system, are helping scientists understand more about Earth. Photo: Gabriel Perez Diaz/Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias
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