In this May 25, 2017 photo, baby eels, also known as elvers, are held in Brewer, Maine. Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardising the species. Photo: AP In this May 25, 2017 photo, baby eels, also known as elvers, are held in Brewer, Maine. Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardising the species. Photo: AP
In this May 25, 2017 photo, baby eels, also known as elvers, are held in Brewer, Maine. Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardising the species. Photo: AP

US launches crackdown on poaching of American baby eels that are in huge demand in Asia

In this May 25, 2017 photo, baby eels, also known as elvers, are held in Brewer, Maine. Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardising the species. Photo: AP In this May 25, 2017 photo, baby eels, also known as elvers, are held in Brewer, Maine. Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardising the species. Photo: AP
In this May 25, 2017 photo, baby eels, also known as elvers, are held in Brewer, Maine. Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardising the species. Photo: AP
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