A shop assistant shows a Japan Tobacco Inc's Ploom Tech smokeless vaping product at its Ploom Shop in Tokyo, Japan, in June 2017. A new report suggests that vaping can increase the risk of cancer due to DNA damage, despite having fewer carcinogens than traditional cigarettes. Photo: Reuters

Vaping may raise cancer risk because of damage to DNA, says study

The report said that e-cigarette users “might have a higher risk than non-smokers” of bladder and lung cancer and heart disease

Topic |   Health and wellness

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A shop assistant shows a Japan Tobacco Inc's Ploom Tech smokeless vaping product at its Ploom Shop in Tokyo, Japan, in June 2017. A new report suggests that vaping can increase the risk of cancer due to DNA damage, despite having fewer carcinogens than traditional cigarettes. Photo: Reuters
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