A strontium atomic clock, one of the world’s most accurate time-keeping pieces, is seen in Professor Jun Ye ‘s lab at the University of Colorado, in Boulder. Photo: NIST via AFP
A strontium atomic clock, one of the world’s most accurate time-keeping pieces, is seen in Professor Jun Ye ‘s lab at the University of Colorado, in Boulder. Photo: NIST via AFP

How the world’s most precise clock could transform fundamental physics

  • US scientist Jun Ye and his team built a device 50 times more exact than today’s best atomic clocks, paving the way for new discoveries in quantum mechanics
  • The breakthrough was achieved by working with webs of light, known as optical lattices, to trap atoms in orderly arrangements

A strontium atomic clock, one of the world’s most accurate time-keeping pieces, is seen in Professor Jun Ye ‘s lab at the University of Colorado, in Boulder. Photo: NIST via AFP
A strontium atomic clock, one of the world’s most accurate time-keeping pieces, is seen in Professor Jun Ye ‘s lab at the University of Colorado, in Boulder. Photo: NIST via AFP
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