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Hong Kong Sports Institute

Swimmer-turned-model Stephanie Au helps out for a good cause as ambassador for disabled sport

The three-time Hong Kong Olympian will help promote disabled sports in the city while aid the HKSAPID raise money for their athletes

PUBLISHED : Monday, 23 April, 2018, 7:56pm
UPDATED : Monday, 23 April, 2018, 9:21pm

Swimmer-turned-model Stephanie Au Hoi-shun lives a busy lifestyle these days but she has managed to squeeze in some of her time to help a good cause.

Recently, she lent her skills – and face – at the Cathay Pacific/HSBC Hong Kong Sevens by becoming an official ambassador at the first ever HSBC Community Day.

Now she’s added a new role, becoming ambassador to the Hong Kong Sports Association for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities charity race. And she’s pleased she can help out for a good cause.

With the forthcoming Asian Games in Indonesia this summer Au’s prime target for the year, the 25-year-old will spend some time outside her training schedule to work with the association, which celebrates its 40th anniversary and make the city aware of disabled sports.

Olympic swimmer Stephanie Au tries out her rugby skills with Hong Kong kids on Community Day

Au will be in good company as she joins Tang Wai-lok, Hong Kong’s gold medal winner in record time at the Rio Paralympic Games in the men’s 200 metre freestyle. Au, a three-time Olympian, was Hong Kong’s flag bearer at the Rio Olympics, another honour that was bestowed on her.

Although swimming in different categories, Au and Tang are working hard to achieve their target, while showcasing the true spirit of the “Same But Different” theme of the charity event.

The HKSAPID hopes to raise HK$1 million through the event to help disabled athletes attain more training and competition opportunities, both locally and on the international stage.

Hong Kong’s Stephanie Au relishing her new role as team mentor as she strikes gold again in Ashgabat

The event will take place at Hong Kong Sports Institute swimming pool on June 24 and participants can form mixed relay teams with disabled swimmers.