Some Zoom users vowed to dump the popular videoconferencing service and switch to competitors, following remarks by its chief executive that the company would work with law enforcement by not encrypting free calls. Photo: BloombergSome Zoom users vowed to dump the popular videoconferencing service and switch to competitors, following remarks by its chief executive that the company would work with law enforcement by not encrypting free calls. Photo: Bloomberg
Some Zoom users vowed to dump the popular videoconferencing service and switch to competitors, following remarks by its chief executive that the company would work with law enforcement by not encrypting free calls. Photo: Bloomberg

Videoconferencing giant Zoom’s pledge to work with law enforcement spurs online blowback

  • The remarks by Zoom chief executive Eric Yuan struck thousands of people on social media as tone-deaf amid recent marches against police brutality
  • Yuan sought to assuage users’ concerns on Wednesday, saying the company was striving to ‘do the right thing’ for vulnerable groups
Topic |   Apps
Some Zoom users vowed to dump the popular videoconferencing service and switch to competitors, following remarks by its chief executive that the company would work with law enforcement by not encrypting free calls. Photo: BloombergSome Zoom users vowed to dump the popular videoconferencing service and switch to competitors, following remarks by its chief executive that the company would work with law enforcement by not encrypting free calls. Photo: Bloomberg
Some Zoom users vowed to dump the popular videoconferencing service and switch to competitors, following remarks by its chief executive that the company would work with law enforcement by not encrypting free calls. Photo: Bloomberg
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