Former Chongqing mayor Huang Qifan, pictured here on June 14, 2017, warned tech companies in a speech at the China Internet Conference on Tuesday that current business models reliant on excessive data collection will be untenable under future regulations in China. Photo: SCMP Former Chongqing mayor Huang Qifan, pictured here on June 14, 2017, warned tech companies in a speech at the China Internet Conference on Tuesday that current business models reliant on excessive data collection will be untenable under future regulations in China. Photo: SCMP
Former Chongqing mayor Huang Qifan, pictured here on June 14, 2017, warned tech companies in a speech at the China Internet Conference on Tuesday that current business models reliant on excessive data collection will be untenable under future regulations in China. Photo: SCMP
Internet

Chongqing’s outspoken ex-mayor speaks his mind about China’s Big Tech companies, offering peek into Beijing’s thinking

  • Former Chongqing mayor Huang Qifan warned that business models relying on harvesting data and taking advantage of human weakness will not work in the future
  • The warning from Huang offers a rare peek into the thinking from Beijing, which has been tightening regulations on Big Tech

Topic |   Internet
Former Chongqing mayor Huang Qifan, pictured here on June 14, 2017, warned tech companies in a speech at the China Internet Conference on Tuesday that current business models reliant on excessive data collection will be untenable under future regulations in China. Photo: SCMP Former Chongqing mayor Huang Qifan, pictured here on June 14, 2017, warned tech companies in a speech at the China Internet Conference on Tuesday that current business models reliant on excessive data collection will be untenable under future regulations in China. Photo: SCMP
Former Chongqing mayor Huang Qifan, pictured here on June 14, 2017, warned tech companies in a speech at the China Internet Conference on Tuesday that current business models reliant on excessive data collection will be untenable under future regulations in China. Photo: SCMP
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