A man plays the popular Honour of Kings online game from Chinese gaming giant Tencent on a high-speed train from Henan to Beijing on September 15. In a document published this week, 213 gaming companies committed to closing loopholes to its systems combating gaming addiction, including the use of overseas platforms. Photo: AP A man plays the popular Honour of Kings online game from Chinese gaming giant Tencent on a high-speed train from Henan to Beijing on September 15. In a document published this week, 213 gaming companies committed to closing loopholes to its systems combating gaming addiction, including the use of overseas platforms. Photo: AP
A man plays the popular Honour of Kings online game from Chinese gaming giant Tencent on a high-speed train from Henan to Beijing on September 15. In a document published this week, 213 gaming companies committed to closing loopholes to its systems combating gaming addiction, including the use of overseas platforms. Photo: AP

China’s video game companies vow to boycott overseas platforms and close loopholes for young gamers amid tighter limits

  • China’s video game industry association and 213 gaming companies, including Tencent and NetEase, pledged to crack down on access to overseas platforms
  • The pact is not legally binding, but it puts in writing a pledge to remove content targeted by authorities such as ‘effeminate men’ and money worship

Topic |   Video gaming
A man plays the popular Honour of Kings online game from Chinese gaming giant Tencent on a high-speed train from Henan to Beijing on September 15. In a document published this week, 213 gaming companies committed to closing loopholes to its systems combating gaming addiction, including the use of overseas platforms. Photo: AP A man plays the popular Honour of Kings online game from Chinese gaming giant Tencent on a high-speed train from Henan to Beijing on September 15. In a document published this week, 213 gaming companies committed to closing loopholes to its systems combating gaming addiction, including the use of overseas platforms. Photo: AP
A man plays the popular Honour of Kings online game from Chinese gaming giant Tencent on a high-speed train from Henan to Beijing on September 15. In a document published this week, 213 gaming companies committed to closing loopholes to its systems combating gaming addiction, including the use of overseas platforms. Photo: AP
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