Human embryos grow in a laboratory for a few days after researchers used gene editing technology to successfully repair a heart disease-causing genetic mutation. US scientists were able to turn off a cholesterol-linked gene, opening the way to treat high cholesterol and liver diseases. Photo: Oregon Health&Science University via APHuman embryos grow in a laboratory for a few days after researchers used gene editing technology to successfully repair a heart disease-causing genetic mutation. US scientists were able to turn off a cholesterol-linked gene, opening the way to treat high cholesterol and liver diseases. Photo: Oregon Health&Science University via AP
Human embryos grow in a laboratory for a few days after researchers used gene editing technology to successfully repair a heart disease-causing genetic mutation. US scientists were able to turn off a cholesterol-linked gene, opening the way to treat high cholesterol and liver diseases. Photo: Oregon Health&Science University via AP

US scientists turn off cholesterol-linked gene, opening the way to treat high cholesterol and liver diseases

Topic |   Science
Human embryos grow in a laboratory for a few days after researchers used gene editing technology to successfully repair a heart disease-causing genetic mutation. US scientists were able to turn off a cholesterol-linked gene, opening the way to treat high cholesterol and liver diseases. Photo: Oregon Health&Science University via APHuman embryos grow in a laboratory for a few days after researchers used gene editing technology to successfully repair a heart disease-causing genetic mutation. US scientists were able to turn off a cholesterol-linked gene, opening the way to treat high cholesterol and liver diseases. Photo: Oregon Health&Science University via AP
Human embryos grow in a laboratory for a few days after researchers used gene editing technology to successfully repair a heart disease-causing genetic mutation. US scientists were able to turn off a cholesterol-linked gene, opening the way to treat high cholesterol and liver diseases. Photo: Oregon Health&Science University via AP
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