Smartphones increasingly help people track health and fitness regimens, but many are not properly informing users about how their data is handled, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. Photo: Getty Images
Smartphones increasingly help people track health and fitness regimens, but many are not properly informing users about how their data is handled, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. Photo: Getty Images
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Many health apps pose privacy risk, fail to adequately inform users of data polices, study finds

  • An analysis of more than 20,000 apps found many were not adequately informing users of data policies, including sending data to third parties like advertisers
  • Nearly 30 per cent of apps in the research do not include any privacy policy text

Smartphones increasingly help people track health and fitness regimens, but many are not properly informing users about how their data is handled, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. Photo: Getty Images
Smartphones increasingly help people track health and fitness regimens, but many are not properly informing users about how their data is handled, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. Photo: Getty Images
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