South Korea’s Rural Development Administration hopes its Headeul and Alchanmi rice will prove more popular than their Japanese counterparts. Photo: Shutterstock South Korea’s Rural Development Administration hopes its Headeul and Alchanmi rice will prove more popular than their Japanese counterparts. Photo: Shutterstock
South Korea’s Rural Development Administration hopes its Headeul and Alchanmi rice will prove more popular than their Japanese counterparts. Photo: Shutterstock
South Korea

South Korea wants to replace Japanese rice, but says politics has nothing to do with it

  • Nearly 10 per cent of South Korean paddy fields have been given over to the cultivation of high-end Japanese rice strains in recent years
  • But now a government agency is hoping to lure consumers away with two new home-grown varieties it says are tastier and more affordable

Topic |   South Korea
South Korea’s Rural Development Administration hopes its Headeul and Alchanmi rice will prove more popular than their Japanese counterparts. Photo: Shutterstock South Korea’s Rural Development Administration hopes its Headeul and Alchanmi rice will prove more popular than their Japanese counterparts. Photo: Shutterstock
South Korea’s Rural Development Administration hopes its Headeul and Alchanmi rice will prove more popular than their Japanese counterparts. Photo: Shutterstock
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