The late Samsung Group Chairman Lee Kun-hee is pictured in 2008. His death has focused attention on the darker aspects of his legacy, and reignited calls to reform family-run conglomerates. Photo: EPA-EFE The late Samsung Group Chairman Lee Kun-hee is pictured in 2008. His death has focused attention on the darker aspects of his legacy, and reignited calls to reform family-run conglomerates. Photo: EPA-EFE
The late Samsung Group Chairman Lee Kun-hee is pictured in 2008. His death has focused attention on the darker aspects of his legacy, and reignited calls to reform family-run conglomerates. Photo: EPA-EFE
South Korea

In South Korea, chaebol reform calls rekindled after Samsung patriarch Lee Kun-hee’s death

  • Family-run South Korean conglomerates like Samsung have a reputation for corruption, unfair business practices and opaque leadership structures
  • President Moon Jae-in once described them as ‘deep-rooted evils’ plaguing the country, but an academic said it would be a ‘miracle’ if he can reform them

Topic |   South Korea
The late Samsung Group Chairman Lee Kun-hee is pictured in 2008. His death has focused attention on the darker aspects of his legacy, and reignited calls to reform family-run conglomerates. Photo: EPA-EFE The late Samsung Group Chairman Lee Kun-hee is pictured in 2008. His death has focused attention on the darker aspects of his legacy, and reignited calls to reform family-run conglomerates. Photo: EPA-EFE
The late Samsung Group Chairman Lee Kun-hee is pictured in 2008. His death has focused attention on the darker aspects of his legacy, and reignited calls to reform family-run conglomerates. Photo: EPA-EFE
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