In March, the police confiscated 41 komodo dragons from a wildlife trafficking syndicate in East Java. The dragons were to be sold for upwards of US$35,000 each. Photo: Reuters In March, the police confiscated 41 komodo dragons from a wildlife trafficking syndicate in East Java. The dragons were to be sold for upwards of US$35,000 each. Photo: Reuters
In March, the police confiscated 41 komodo dragons from a wildlife trafficking syndicate in East Java. The dragons were to be sold for upwards of US$35,000 each. Photo: Reuters
Dikanaya Tarahita
Opinion

Opinion

Dikanaya Tarahita and Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Indonesia’s pre-social media laws are no match for animal traffickers

  • In just one year, WWF Indonesia identified 2,500 adverts on Facebook and 2,207 ads on Instagram that were selling either animals or their body parts
  • Offences against wildlife cost Indonesia, one of the world’s most biodiverse nations, almost US$1 billion a year

In March, the police confiscated 41 komodo dragons from a wildlife trafficking syndicate in East Java. The dragons were to be sold for upwards of US$35,000 each. Photo: Reuters In March, the police confiscated 41 komodo dragons from a wildlife trafficking syndicate in East Java. The dragons were to be sold for upwards of US$35,000 each. Photo: Reuters
In March, the police confiscated 41 komodo dragons from a wildlife trafficking syndicate in East Java. The dragons were to be sold for upwards of US$35,000 each. Photo: Reuters
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Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat is an academic at Universitas Islam Indonesia and is a researcher associate at Jakarta-based Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (INDEF). His research focuses on China's foreign policy in Indonesia and the Middle East. He completed his PhD on the Belt and Road Initiatives in the Gulf at the University of Manchester in 2018.