Singing in a group and in closed, poorly ventilated environments may generate more aerosols than speaking. Photo: SCMP Pictures Singing in a group and in closed, poorly ventilated environments may generate more aerosols than speaking. Photo: SCMP Pictures
Singing in a group and in closed, poorly ventilated environments may generate more aerosols than speaking. Photo: SCMP Pictures
The Conversation
Opinion

Opinion

The Conversation

Video shows just how easily Covid-19 could spread when people sing together

  • New study includes filming droplets and aerosols emitted when someone sings, highlighting how singing might be an infection risk
  • We tend to think of only coughs or sneezes as the primary source of generating aerosols. But even breathing generates aerosols

Singing in a group and in closed, poorly ventilated environments may generate more aerosols than speaking. Photo: SCMP Pictures Singing in a group and in closed, poorly ventilated environments may generate more aerosols than speaking. Photo: SCMP Pictures
Singing in a group and in closed, poorly ventilated environments may generate more aerosols than speaking. Photo: SCMP Pictures
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