Saburo Nei, a Japanese diplomat who was stationed in Vladivostok in 1941 and who issued visas to help Jews as they fled Eastern Europe. He is pictured in 1935. Photo courtesy of Akira KitadeSaburo Nei, a Japanese diplomat who was stationed in Vladivostok in 1941 and who issued visas to help Jews as they fled Eastern Europe. He is pictured in 1935. Photo courtesy of Akira Kitade
Saburo Nei, a Japanese diplomat who was stationed in Vladivostok in 1941 and who issued visas to help Jews as they fled Eastern Europe. He is pictured in 1935. Photo courtesy of Akira Kitade

A second ‘Japanese Schindler’ uncovered: how a diplomat helped Jews fleeing Nazi Germany

  • A faded travel document shows how Saburo Nei, a Japanese diplomat in Vladivostok, helped a Jewish family after they fled Eastern Europe in 1941
  • Another Japanese diplomat, Chiune Sugihara, was likened to Oskar Schindler for issuing visas to help Jews escape Lithuania during World War II
Topic |   Japan
Saburo Nei, a Japanese diplomat who was stationed in Vladivostok in 1941 and who issued visas to help Jews as they fled Eastern Europe. He is pictured in 1935. Photo courtesy of Akira KitadeSaburo Nei, a Japanese diplomat who was stationed in Vladivostok in 1941 and who issued visas to help Jews as they fled Eastern Europe. He is pictured in 1935. Photo courtesy of Akira Kitade
Saburo Nei, a Japanese diplomat who was stationed in Vladivostok in 1941 and who issued visas to help Jews as they fled Eastern Europe. He is pictured in 1935. Photo courtesy of Akira Kitade
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