A China Coast Guard ship is seen from an Indonesian naval ship during a patrol in Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone north of Natuna island on January 11. Photo: Reuters A China Coast Guard ship is seen from an Indonesian naval ship during a patrol in Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone north of Natuna island on January 11. Photo: Reuters
A China Coast Guard ship is seen from an Indonesian naval ship during a patrol in Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone north of Natuna island on January 11. Photo: Reuters
Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat
Opinion

Opinion

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat and Dikanaya Tarahita

As Indonesia stands up to China in the Natuna islands, can Japan come to the rescue?

  • Indonesia recently forced Chinese fishing vessels from its waters as it held meetings with Japan’s foreign minister to strengthen ties
  • But will Indonesia’s closer links with Japan help it face off against China? Especially as Tokyo’s relationship with Beijing improves

A China Coast Guard ship is seen from an Indonesian naval ship during a patrol in Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone north of Natuna island on January 11. Photo: Reuters A China Coast Guard ship is seen from an Indonesian naval ship during a patrol in Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone north of Natuna island on January 11. Photo: Reuters
A China Coast Guard ship is seen from an Indonesian naval ship during a patrol in Indonesia’s exclusive economic zone north of Natuna island on January 11. Photo: Reuters
READ FULL ARTICLE
Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat is an academic at Universitas Islam Indonesia and is a researcher associate at Jakarta-based Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (INDEF). His research focuses on China's foreign policy in Indonesia and the Middle East. He completed his PhD on the Belt and Road Initiatives in the Gulf at the University of Manchester in 2018.