Despite domestic criticism for the way he has handled the coronavirus outbreak, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has maintained good relations with China, providing an opportunity to play an even bigger role as an international consensus-builder. Photo: DPA Despite domestic criticism for the way he has handled the coronavirus outbreak, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has maintained good relations with China, providing an opportunity to play an even bigger role as an international consensus-builder. Photo: DPA
Despite domestic criticism for the way he has handled the coronavirus outbreak, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has maintained good relations with China, providing an opportunity to play an even bigger role as an international consensus-builder. Photo: DPA
Elliot Silverberg
Opinion

Opinion

Elliot Silverberg

Coronavirus silver lining for Japan: better ties with China?

  • The Covid-19 pandemic provides an opportunity for Shinzo Abe and his potential successors to showcase their political mettle
  • Unlike Donald Trump, Abe has refrained from blaming China to score cheap political points. In fact, the crisis has strengthened relations

Despite domestic criticism for the way he has handled the coronavirus outbreak, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has maintained good relations with China, providing an opportunity to play an even bigger role as an international consensus-builder. Photo: DPA Despite domestic criticism for the way he has handled the coronavirus outbreak, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has maintained good relations with China, providing an opportunity to play an even bigger role as an international consensus-builder. Photo: DPA
Despite domestic criticism for the way he has handled the coronavirus outbreak, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has maintained good relations with China, providing an opportunity to play an even bigger role as an international consensus-builder. Photo: DPA
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Elliot Silverberg

Elliot Silverberg

Elliot Silverberg is a fellow at Georgetown University’s Institute for the Study of Diplomacy, and a non-resident fellow in Korean studies at the Pacific Forum in Hawaii