A migrant worker sits outside his room in a dormitory, declared as an isolation area, amid the Covid-19 outbreak in Singapore. Photo: Reuters A migrant worker sits outside his room in a dormitory, declared as an isolation area, amid the Covid-19 outbreak in Singapore. Photo: Reuters
A migrant worker sits outside his room in a dormitory, declared as an isolation area, amid the Covid-19 outbreak in Singapore. Photo: Reuters
Ken Kwek
Opinion

Opinion

Ken Kwek

Singapore’s addiction to growth is built on the backs of migrant workers

  • Some 90 per cent of the island nation’s Covid-19 cases are linked to migrant worker dormitories – exposing ingrained social and systemic prejudices
  • The question is whether conditions, practices and attitudes towards these workers will change after the crisis has abated

A migrant worker sits outside his room in a dormitory, declared as an isolation area, amid the Covid-19 outbreak in Singapore. Photo: Reuters A migrant worker sits outside his room in a dormitory, declared as an isolation area, amid the Covid-19 outbreak in Singapore. Photo: Reuters
A migrant worker sits outside his room in a dormitory, declared as an isolation area, amid the Covid-19 outbreak in Singapore. Photo: Reuters
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