An unauthorised steel factory in Inner Mongolia. Moving the focus away from growth could enable China to focus on other matters, such as the environment. Photo: Getty Images An unauthorised steel factory in Inner Mongolia. Moving the focus away from growth could enable China to focus on other matters, such as the environment. Photo: Getty Images
An unauthorised steel factory in Inner Mongolia. Moving the focus away from growth could enable China to focus on other matters, such as the environment. Photo: Getty Images
Chandran Nair
Opinion

Opinion

Chandran Nair

China’s decision to drop economic growth target is a blessing in disguise

  • The more Beijing weans itself off growth as the economic metric, the freer it will be to concentrate on the environment, health and education
  • Growth targets inevitably lock developing countries into a Western model of economic policy and a Western notion of how globalisation should work

An unauthorised steel factory in Inner Mongolia. Moving the focus away from growth could enable China to focus on other matters, such as the environment. Photo: Getty Images An unauthorised steel factory in Inner Mongolia. Moving the focus away from growth could enable China to focus on other matters, such as the environment. Photo: Getty Images
An unauthorised steel factory in Inner Mongolia. Moving the focus away from growth could enable China to focus on other matters, such as the environment. Photo: Getty Images
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Chandran Nair

Chandran Nair

Chandran Nair is the founder of the Global Institute for Tomorrow and member of the Club of Rome. He is also the author of The Sustainable State: The Future of Government, Economy and Society