An intersection in Kuala Lumpur, as Malaysia eases its coronavirus restrictions to allow economic activity to resume. Economists say stimulus packages should be administered carefully and only spent in necessary areas. Photo: Xinhua An intersection in Kuala Lumpur, as Malaysia eases its coronavirus restrictions to allow economic activity to resume. Economists say stimulus packages should be administered carefully and only spent in necessary areas. Photo: Xinhua
An intersection in Kuala Lumpur, as Malaysia eases its coronavirus restrictions to allow economic activity to resume. Economists say stimulus packages should be administered carefully and only spent in necessary areas. Photo: Xinhua
Bhavan Jaipragas
Opinion

Opinion

Bhavan Jaipragas

Massive stimulus packages not enough to rescue coronavirus-hit economies

  • Size does not necessarily matter when it comes to stimulus packages, amid concerns over dysfunctional execution, haphazard allocation and weak accountability
  • In Southeast Asia, where governments have shown a willingness to spend, there is good reason to question some of the measures being rolled out

An intersection in Kuala Lumpur, as Malaysia eases its coronavirus restrictions to allow economic activity to resume. Economists say stimulus packages should be administered carefully and only spent in necessary areas. Photo: Xinhua An intersection in Kuala Lumpur, as Malaysia eases its coronavirus restrictions to allow economic activity to resume. Economists say stimulus packages should be administered carefully and only spent in necessary areas. Photo: Xinhua
An intersection in Kuala Lumpur, as Malaysia eases its coronavirus restrictions to allow economic activity to resume. Economists say stimulus packages should be administered carefully and only spent in necessary areas. Photo: Xinhua
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Bhavan Jaipragas

Bhavan Jaipragas

Bhavan is Asia Correspondent for the SCMP, covering breaking news, politics, diplomacy, trade and Southeast Asian macroeconomic trends. His work for the Post's Asia desk also focuses on the region's multifaceted interactions with the United States and China. A Singapore native, Bhavan previously worked for Agence France-Presse.