A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook
A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook
Lynn Lee
Opinion

Opinion

Lynn Lee

From Indonesia to Hong Kong to Singapore, an ongoing battle against racist stereotypes

  • A Singapore children’s book depicted a school bully as dark skinned while other pupils were fair. It’s just one of many racist tropes in media and literature
  • Psychologists say even simple images reinforce unconscious biases that if left unchecked, are of great detriment to society

A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook
A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook
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Lynn Lee

Lynn Lee

Lynn Lee is the Post's Asia Editor, and deputy editor of its This Week in Asia magazine. She has 15 years of experience spanning journalism, corporate communications and public affairs in Singapore and Indonesia. Lynn studied East Asian studies and international relations in the United States.