A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: FacebookA children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook
A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook
Lynn Lee
Opinion

Opinion

Lynn Lee

From Indonesia to Hong Kong to Singapore, an ongoing battle against racist stereotypes

  • A Singapore children’s book depicted a school bully as dark skinned while other pupils were fair. It’s just one of many racist tropes in media and literature
  • Psychologists say even simple images reinforce unconscious biases that if left unchecked, are of great detriment to society

A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: FacebookA children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook
A children’s book that features a bully who is “dark-skinned with a head of oily curls” has been pulled from Singapore’s public libraries. Photo: Facebook
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