A doctor wearing a hazmat suit pictured administering a vaccine for a patient in Depok, Indonesia. Photo: EPA A doctor wearing a hazmat suit pictured administering a vaccine for a patient in Depok, Indonesia. Photo: EPA
A doctor wearing a hazmat suit pictured administering a vaccine for a patient in Depok, Indonesia. Photo: EPA
Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat
Opinion

Opinion

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Indonesia’s Sinovac coronavirus vaccine trial raises safety, affordability concerns

  • President Joko Widodo’s demand for a vaccine to be available within months has sparked fears the country is rushing ahead without proper precautions
  • There are also concerns over cost and availability should the trials prove successful and whether ordinary Indonesians are being used as ‘human guinea pigs’

A doctor wearing a hazmat suit pictured administering a vaccine for a patient in Depok, Indonesia. Photo: EPA A doctor wearing a hazmat suit pictured administering a vaccine for a patient in Depok, Indonesia. Photo: EPA
A doctor wearing a hazmat suit pictured administering a vaccine for a patient in Depok, Indonesia. Photo: EPA
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Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat is an academic at Universitas Islam Indonesia and is a researcher associate at Jakarta-based Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (INDEF). His research focuses on China's foreign policy in Indonesia and the Middle East. He completed his PhD on the Belt and Road Initiatives in the Gulf at the University of Manchester in 2018.