People shop at a market in Jakarta. Indonesia’s informal sector makes up between 60 and 70 per cent of the economy, and is where the country’s most vulnerable make their living. Photo: Reuters People shop at a market in Jakarta. Indonesia’s informal sector makes up between 60 and 70 per cent of the economy, and is where the country’s most vulnerable make their living. Photo: Reuters
People shop at a market in Jakarta. Indonesia’s informal sector makes up between 60 and 70 per cent of the economy, and is where the country’s most vulnerable make their living. Photo: Reuters
Johannes Nugroho
Opinion

Opinion

Johannes Nugroho

As Indonesia faces recession, failure to help informal sector will cost it dearly

  • Covid-19 has hit Southeast Asia’s largest economy hard and a US$48 billion stimulus is not really addressing the needs of informal workers
  • During the Asian Financial Crisis, the informal sector kept the economy going

People shop at a market in Jakarta. Indonesia’s informal sector makes up between 60 and 70 per cent of the economy, and is where the country’s most vulnerable make their living. Photo: Reuters People shop at a market in Jakarta. Indonesia’s informal sector makes up between 60 and 70 per cent of the economy, and is where the country’s most vulnerable make their living. Photo: Reuters
People shop at a market in Jakarta. Indonesia’s informal sector makes up between 60 and 70 per cent of the economy, and is where the country’s most vulnerable make their living. Photo: Reuters
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Johannes Nugroho

Johannes Nugroho

Johannes Nugroho is a writer and political analyst from Surabaya, Indonesia