Reuters Southeast Asia chief Matthew Tostevin hailed this unidentified man as a “protester standing his ground”. The photograph is extremely different visually from the Thai PBS version, despite being taken around the same time. Photo: Soe Zeya Tun / Reuters Reuters Southeast Asia chief Matthew Tostevin hailed this unidentified man as a “protester standing his ground”. The photograph is extremely different visually from the Thai PBS version, despite being taken around the same time. Photo: Soe Zeya Tun / Reuters
Reuters Southeast Asia chief Matthew Tostevin hailed this unidentified man as a “protester standing his ground”. The photograph is extremely different visually from the Thai PBS version, despite being taken around the same time. Photo: Soe Zeya Tun / Reuters
Marielle Descalsota
Opinion

Opinion

Marielle Descalsota

The problem with ‘Hunger Games’ photographs of the Thai protests

  • The protests have given rise to a new style of documentary photography in which students are depicted as Hollywood heroines and Mockingjays
  • But these deceptively beautiful pictures blur the line between art and reality, begging the question: did these events really occur?

Reuters Southeast Asia chief Matthew Tostevin hailed this unidentified man as a “protester standing his ground”. The photograph is extremely different visually from the Thai PBS version, despite being taken around the same time. Photo: Soe Zeya Tun / Reuters Reuters Southeast Asia chief Matthew Tostevin hailed this unidentified man as a “protester standing his ground”. The photograph is extremely different visually from the Thai PBS version, despite being taken around the same time. Photo: Soe Zeya Tun / Reuters
Reuters Southeast Asia chief Matthew Tostevin hailed this unidentified man as a “protester standing his ground”. The photograph is extremely different visually from the Thai PBS version, despite being taken around the same time. Photo: Soe Zeya Tun / Reuters
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