Islamic studies students attend a class at the Xinjiang Islamic Institute during a government-organised trip in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, China. Photo: Reuters Islamic studies students attend a class at the Xinjiang Islamic Institute during a government-organised trip in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, China. Photo: Reuters
Islamic studies students attend a class at the Xinjiang Islamic Institute during a government-organised trip in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, China. Photo: Reuters
Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat
Opinion

Opinion

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat and Habib Pashya

For Indonesia’s Santri Muslims, a chance to bridge gap with China on Uygurs

  • China’s effort to provide scholarships to Santri students can be considered an attempt to legitimise its interests in Indonesia
  • But the Santri students should not only enjoy the scholarships – they need to pressure the Indonesian and Chinese governments to put an end to Uygur detentions

Islamic studies students attend a class at the Xinjiang Islamic Institute during a government-organised trip in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, China. Photo: Reuters Islamic studies students attend a class at the Xinjiang Islamic Institute during a government-organised trip in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, China. Photo: Reuters
Islamic studies students attend a class at the Xinjiang Islamic Institute during a government-organised trip in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, China. Photo: Reuters
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Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat

Muhammad Zulfikar Rakhmat is an academic at Universitas Islam Indonesia and is a researcher associate at Jakarta-based Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (INDEF). His research focuses on China's foreign policy in Indonesia and the Middle East. He completed his PhD on the Belt and Road Initiatives in the Gulf at the University of Manchester in 2018.

Habib Pashya

Habib Pashya

Habib Pashya is a student at Universitas Islam Indonesia.