A Japanese submarine takes part in an anti-submarine military exercise in the South China Sea in this 2018 file photo. Photo: EPA/Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Handout A Japanese submarine takes part in an anti-submarine military exercise in the South China Sea in this 2018 file photo. Photo: EPA/Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Handout
A Japanese submarine takes part in an anti-submarine military exercise in the South China Sea in this 2018 file photo. Photo: EPA/Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Handout
Ding Duo
Opinion

Opinion

Ding Duo

Japan’s diplomatic note on the South China Sea shows its self-interest at play

  • The timing of Tokyo’s note verbale, on the eve of Joe Biden’s inauguration as US president, is a signal of support for its ally
  • It also shows how lawfare will continue to be a factor in multilateralist, ‘rules-based’ efforts to stabilise the situation in the contested waterway

A Japanese submarine takes part in an anti-submarine military exercise in the South China Sea in this 2018 file photo. Photo: EPA/Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Handout A Japanese submarine takes part in an anti-submarine military exercise in the South China Sea in this 2018 file photo. Photo: EPA/Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Handout
A Japanese submarine takes part in an anti-submarine military exercise in the South China Sea in this 2018 file photo. Photo: EPA/Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force Handout
READ FULL ARTICLE
Ding Duo

Ding Duo

Ding Duo is an associate research fellow at the National Institute for South China Sea Studies (NISCSS). His research interests include general theory of public international law, international law of the sea, and South China Sea issues. Ding obtained his Master's and PhD in Law from Yonsei University, Korea.