Narendra Modi and Imran Khan, the respective leaders of India and Pakistan, have much work to do to bridge the gap between the two countries. Photo: AFP Narendra Modi and Imran Khan, the respective leaders of India and Pakistan, have much work to do to bridge the gap between the two countries. Photo: AFP
Narendra Modi and Imran Khan, the respective leaders of India and Pakistan, have much work to do to bridge the gap between the two countries. Photo: AFP
Ramesh Thakur
Opinion

Opinion

Ramesh Thakur

Can South Asia put India-Pakistan hostilities behind to unite for greater good?

  • Hostility between the two giants of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation has translated into disarray within the entire group
  • But common threats to its members, such as the coronavirus, poverty and threats to internal security, underscore the urgency to find shared solutions

Narendra Modi and Imran Khan, the respective leaders of India and Pakistan, have much work to do to bridge the gap between the two countries. Photo: AFP Narendra Modi and Imran Khan, the respective leaders of India and Pakistan, have much work to do to bridge the gap between the two countries. Photo: AFP
Narendra Modi and Imran Khan, the respective leaders of India and Pakistan, have much work to do to bridge the gap between the two countries. Photo: AFP
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Ramesh Thakur

Ramesh Thakur

Ramesh Thakur is an emeritus professor at the Crawford School of Public Policy at Australian National University, a fellow at the Australian Institute of International Affairs, a senior research fellow with the Toda Peace Institute, and a former United Nations assistant secretary general.