A crowd dances at President Herbert Hoover’s inaugural ball at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington in March 1929. Before the year was over, the Roaring Twenties would come to an end and the Great Depression would begin. Photo: Reuters A crowd dances at President Herbert Hoover’s inaugural ball at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington in March 1929. Before the year was over, the Roaring Twenties would come to an end and the Great Depression would begin. Photo: Reuters
A crowd dances at President Herbert Hoover’s inaugural ball at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington in March 1929. Before the year was over, the Roaring Twenties would come to an end and the Great Depression would begin. Photo: Reuters
Neil Newman
Opinion

Opinion

Abacus by Neil Newman

This Easter, 100 years on, I’m wondering if the Twenties could roar again

  • The Roaring Twenties were the antidote for World War I and the last global pandemic, a dimension of tough times we have all but forgotten
  • History has a curious habit of repeating itself, especially the bad bits – but could there be a period of prosperity and spontaneous creativity once we deal with current crises?

A crowd dances at President Herbert Hoover’s inaugural ball at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington in March 1929. Before the year was over, the Roaring Twenties would come to an end and the Great Depression would begin. Photo: Reuters A crowd dances at President Herbert Hoover’s inaugural ball at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington in March 1929. Before the year was over, the Roaring Twenties would come to an end and the Great Depression would begin. Photo: Reuters
A crowd dances at President Herbert Hoover’s inaugural ball at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington in March 1929. Before the year was over, the Roaring Twenties would come to an end and the Great Depression would begin. Photo: Reuters
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Neil Newman

Neil Newman

Neil Newman is a thematic portfolio strategist focused on pan-Asian equity markets. Experienced in the major global financial centres of Tokyo, London and New York, he is a regular commentator on commercial investment strategies that suit constantly changing investor trends. He is a long-term resident of Hong Kong.