As the oceans warm, species have tracked their preferred temperatures by moving towards the poles. Photo: Reuters As the oceans warm, species have tracked their preferred temperatures by moving towards the poles. Photo: Reuters
As the oceans warm, species have tracked their preferred temperatures by moving towards the poles. Photo: Reuters
The Conversation
Opinion

Opinion

The Conversation

As marine life flees to cooler waters due to global warming, history warns this could lead to mass extinction

  • Equatorial waters are already too hot for many species to survive, with potentially profound implications for marine ecosystems and human livelihoods
  • When the same thing happened 252 million years ago, 90 per cent of all marine species died – but we can take actions to mitigate the effects of climate change

As the oceans warm, species have tracked their preferred temperatures by moving towards the poles. Photo: Reuters As the oceans warm, species have tracked their preferred temperatures by moving towards the poles. Photo: Reuters
As the oceans warm, species have tracked their preferred temperatures by moving towards the poles. Photo: Reuters
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The Conversation

The Conversation

The Conversation Australia and New Zealand is a unique collaboration between academics and journalists that in just 10 years has become the world’s leading publisher of research-based news and analysis. It was founded in Melbourne in 2011.