New Zealand has steered away from war games designed to demonstrate collective opposition to China, preferring instead to quietly grumble about democracy in Hong Kong, the law of the sea and Xinjiang. Photo: Shutterstock New Zealand has steered away from war games designed to demonstrate collective opposition to China, preferring instead to quietly grumble about democracy in Hong Kong, the law of the sea and Xinjiang. Photo: Shutterstock
New Zealand has steered away from war games designed to demonstrate collective opposition to China, preferring instead to quietly grumble about democracy in Hong Kong, the law of the sea and Xinjiang. Photo: Shutterstock
Alexander Gillespie
Opinion

Opinion

Alexander Gillespie

Diplomacy or appeasement? New Zealand’s China policy risks undermining its commitments to human rights, democracy

  • New Zealand has steered away from war games designed to demonstrate collective opposition to China, preferring instead to quietly grumble about democracy in Hong Kong, the law of the sea and Xinjiang
  • There is merit in trying to be an honest broker, but there needs to be some evidence of success. New Zealand can either act as a genuine intermediary on what a new world order might look like – or it can make a stand

New Zealand has steered away from war games designed to demonstrate collective opposition to China, preferring instead to quietly grumble about democracy in Hong Kong, the law of the sea and Xinjiang. Photo: Shutterstock New Zealand has steered away from war games designed to demonstrate collective opposition to China, preferring instead to quietly grumble about democracy in Hong Kong, the law of the sea and Xinjiang. Photo: Shutterstock
New Zealand has steered away from war games designed to demonstrate collective opposition to China, preferring instead to quietly grumble about democracy in Hong Kong, the law of the sea and Xinjiang. Photo: Shutterstock
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Alexander Gillespie

Alexander Gillespie

Alexander Gillespie is a law professor at the University of Waikato in New Zealand. He works primarily in international law, specialising in the environment and the laws of war/international humanitarian law.