People ride motorbikes past a poster featuring information on coming legislative elections in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Wednesday. Photo: EPA People ride motorbikes past a poster featuring information on coming legislative elections in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Wednesday. Photo: EPA
People ride motorbikes past a poster featuring information on coming legislative elections in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Wednesday. Photo: EPA
Dien Nguyen An Luong
Opinion

Opinion

Dien Nguyen An Luong

Vietnam may not want China’s Covid-19 vaccines, but how long can it stay immune to them?

  • Surging case numbers, dismal vaccination rates, and new waves of more transmissible variants have made the need for shots in arms all the more dire
  • But accepting Chinese vaccines poses its own problem for the government: how to talk an increasingly anti-China audience at home into taking them?

People ride motorbikes past a poster featuring information on coming legislative elections in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Wednesday. Photo: EPA People ride motorbikes past a poster featuring information on coming legislative elections in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Wednesday. Photo: EPA
People ride motorbikes past a poster featuring information on coming legislative elections in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Wednesday. Photo: EPA
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Dien Nguyen An Luong

Dien Nguyen An Luong

Dien Luong is a visiting fellow at the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute, Singapore. His work has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian, Al Jazeera, and other publications.