Professor Jia Qingguo warned in March that excessive demands for permission to meet foreigners was hampering research. File photo Professor Jia Qingguo warned in March that excessive demands for permission to meet foreigners was hampering research. File photo
Professor Jia Qingguo warned in March that excessive demands for permission to meet foreigners was hampering research. File photo
Rana Mitter
Opinion

Opinion

Asian Angle by Rana Mitter

Restricting academics makes it harder for China to tell its own story

  • By clamping down on the freedom of scholars to have frank discussions with their Western counterparts, Beijing is copying one of the worst aspects of the Donald Trump administration
  • Hong Kong was once an escape valve for discussions on China, but the national security law has changed the atmosphere

Professor Jia Qingguo warned in March that excessive demands for permission to meet foreigners was hampering research. File photo Professor Jia Qingguo warned in March that excessive demands for permission to meet foreigners was hampering research. File photo
Professor Jia Qingguo warned in March that excessive demands for permission to meet foreigners was hampering research. File photo
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Rana Mitter

Rana Mitter

Rana Mitter is Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China at the University of Oxford and author of A Bitter Revolution: China’s Struggle with the Modern World and China’s War with Japan, 1937-45: The Struggle for Survival