South Korean President Moon Jae-in with Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2019. Photo: EPA South Korean President Moon Jae-in with Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2019. Photo: EPA
South Korean President Moon Jae-in with Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2019. Photo: EPA
Andrew Injoo Park
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Injoo Park

How South Korea’s 2022 presidential election could reshape its US-China balancing act

  • The People Power Party, which is the main opposition, has been propelled by support from younger voters, who overwhelmingly prefer the US to China
  • On the other hand, should Lee Jae-myung from the Democratic Party succeed Moon Jae-in as president, he seems poised to seek closer ties with Beijing

South Korean President Moon Jae-in with Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2019. Photo: EPA South Korean President Moon Jae-in with Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2019. Photo: EPA
South Korean President Moon Jae-in with Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2019. Photo: EPA
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