A sexual crisis violence centre in Hong Kong found that about 53 per cent of those who sought help for sexual violence did so within a month of the offence, while the rest waited. Photo: Shutterstock A sexual crisis violence centre in Hong Kong found that about 53 per cent of those who sought help for sexual violence did so within a month of the offence, while the rest waited. Photo: Shutterstock
A sexual crisis violence centre in Hong Kong found that about 53 per cent of those who sought help for sexual violence did so within a month of the offence, while the rest waited. Photo: Shutterstock
Lynn Lee
Opinion

Opinion

As I see it by Lynn Lee

Even with #MeToo, survivors struggle to speak up about sexual assault

  • In societies such as Hong Kong, with strong and effective law enforcement, victim-blaming and fear of second trauma result in women staying silent
  • A Singapore parliament debate this week has also illuminated the problem of unhelpful societal attitudes

A sexual crisis violence centre in Hong Kong found that about 53 per cent of those who sought help for sexual violence did so within a month of the offence, while the rest waited. Photo: Shutterstock A sexual crisis violence centre in Hong Kong found that about 53 per cent of those who sought help for sexual violence did so within a month of the offence, while the rest waited. Photo: Shutterstock
A sexual crisis violence centre in Hong Kong found that about 53 per cent of those who sought help for sexual violence did so within a month of the offence, while the rest waited. Photo: Shutterstock
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