Storm, (R), a 10-metre tall “goddess of the sea” puppet who carries a message of the oceans in crisis, meets Little Amal, a 3.5-metre tall Syrian refugee puppet in Glasgow in November 2021 during the Cop26 UN Climate Change Conference. Photo: AFP
Storm, (R), a 10-metre tall “goddess of the sea” puppet who carries a message of the oceans in crisis, meets Little Amal, a 3.5-metre tall Syrian refugee puppet in Glasgow in November 2021 during the Cop26 UN Climate Change Conference. Photo: AFP
Ashley Bang
Opinion

Opinion

Ashley Bang and Rashid Sumaila

In the wake of COP26, Asia’s troubled oceans must not be left high and dry

  • Health of Earth’s seas, including Asia’s, played only minor role in Glasgow, despite the food and livelihoods they bring to so many people
  • Urgent action is needed as continent’s economies, communities, ecosystems all depend on sustainable management of marine resources

Storm, (R), a 10-metre tall “goddess of the sea” puppet who carries a message of the oceans in crisis, meets Little Amal, a 3.5-metre tall Syrian refugee puppet in Glasgow in November 2021 during the Cop26 UN Climate Change Conference. Photo: AFP
Storm, (R), a 10-metre tall “goddess of the sea” puppet who carries a message of the oceans in crisis, meets Little Amal, a 3.5-metre tall Syrian refugee puppet in Glasgow in November 2021 during the Cop26 UN Climate Change Conference. Photo: AFP
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