A prison officer in Australia locks up a cell. A UN team is due in the country to put pressure on it to do more to improve conditions for detainees and prevent human rights abuses. File photo: AFP
A prison officer in Australia locks up a cell. A UN team is due in the country to put pressure on it to do more to improve conditions for detainees and prevent human rights abuses. File photo: AFP
Lindsay A. Pearce
Opinion

Opinion

Lindsay A. Pearce and Stuart Kinner

Why is a UN torture prevention team visiting Australia?

  • Group will look at how human rights abuses can be prevented in detention and conditions improved, including for indigenous groups
  • Visit means international pressure on Australia to finally move forward with anti-torture protocol commitments; it has been dragging its feet

A prison officer in Australia locks up a cell. A UN team is due in the country to put pressure on it to do more to improve conditions for detainees and prevent human rights abuses. File photo: AFP
A prison officer in Australia locks up a cell. A UN team is due in the country to put pressure on it to do more to improve conditions for detainees and prevent human rights abuses. File photo: AFP
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