People ride past the National Assembly building in Hanoi, Vietnam. At the 11th National Congress of the Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV) in 2011, Vietnam announced the goal of raising its international standing.  Photo: AP
People ride past the National Assembly building in Hanoi, Vietnam. At the 11th National Congress of the Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV) in 2011, Vietnam announced the goal of raising its international standing. Photo: AP
Bich Tran
Opinion

Opinion

Asian Angle by Bich Tran

Can Vietnam afford the reputational costs of friendship with Myanmar junta?

  • Vietnam eyes a higher international standing but its response to Myanmar’s political unrest has undermined its global ambitions
  • Vietnam’s leaders likely have domestic political, economic considerations that are holding them back from speaking against the junta

People ride past the National Assembly building in Hanoi, Vietnam. At the 11th National Congress of the Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV) in 2011, Vietnam announced the goal of raising its international standing.  Photo: AP
People ride past the National Assembly building in Hanoi, Vietnam. At the 11th National Congress of the Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV) in 2011, Vietnam announced the goal of raising its international standing. Photo: AP
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