South Korean President Moon Jae-in, second left, and his wife Kim Jung-sook, second right, salute the national flag during an annual ceremony to mark the 40th anniversary of the Gwangju Uprising last month. Photo: DPA South Korean President Moon Jae-in, second left, and his wife Kim Jung-sook, second right, salute the national flag during an annual ceremony to mark the 40th anniversary of the Gwangju Uprising last month. Photo: DPA
South Korean President Moon Jae-in, second left, and his wife Kim Jung-sook, second right, salute the national flag during an annual ceremony to mark the 40th anniversary of the Gwangju Uprising last month. Photo: DPA

In South Korea, history and free speech collide in a battle to define democracy

  • A North Korean defector has been convicted for spreading ‘false facts’ about a seminal moment in the South’s struggle for democracy
  • The case has shone a light on both the limits of free speech and the bitter fights to interpret history that continue to rage in South Korea

Topic |   South Korea
South Korean President Moon Jae-in, second left, and his wife Kim Jung-sook, second right, salute the national flag during an annual ceremony to mark the 40th anniversary of the Gwangju Uprising last month. Photo: DPA South Korean President Moon Jae-in, second left, and his wife Kim Jung-sook, second right, salute the national flag during an annual ceremony to mark the 40th anniversary of the Gwangju Uprising last month. Photo: DPA
South Korean President Moon Jae-in, second left, and his wife Kim Jung-sook, second right, salute the national flag during an annual ceremony to mark the 40th anniversary of the Gwangju Uprising last month. Photo: DPA
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