Yang Jiechi, right, director of the Central Foreign Affairs Commission Office for China, and Wang Yi, left, China's foreign affairs minister, arrive for a meeting with US counterparts at the opening session of US-China talks at the Captain Cook Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Photo: AFP
Yang Jiechi, right, director of the Central Foreign Affairs Commission Office for China, and Wang Yi, left, China's foreign affairs minister, arrive for a meeting with US counterparts at the opening session of US-China talks at the Captain Cook Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Photo: AFP

Is US-China friction at Alaska meetings a sign of worse to come or start of something better?

  • Analysts in Asia say both Washington and Beijing are hesitant to give ground on issues that divide them, like the South China Sea
  • But others see possible areas of cooperation, such as over Myanmar, climate change and the coronavirus pandemic

Yang Jiechi, right, director of the Central Foreign Affairs Commission Office for China, and Wang Yi, left, China's foreign affairs minister, arrive for a meeting with US counterparts at the opening session of US-China talks at the Captain Cook Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Photo: AFP
Yang Jiechi, right, director of the Central Foreign Affairs Commission Office for China, and Wang Yi, left, China's foreign affairs minister, arrive for a meeting with US counterparts at the opening session of US-China talks at the Captain Cook Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Photo: AFP
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