A wooden statue of Zen master Yinyuan Longqi, known as Ingen in Japan. Photo: Courtesy of Obaku-san Manpuku-ji in Kyoto Prefecture/Kyodo
A wooden statue of Zen master Yinyuan Longqi, known as Ingen in Japan. Photo: Courtesy of Obaku-san Manpuku-ji in Kyoto Prefecture/Kyodo

Japan eyes loaning China a monk statue to mark ties, after years of panda diplomacy

  • Yinyuan Longqi founded the Obaku sect of Zen Buddhism in 1645 after travelling to Japan, where a statue of him incorporating hair from his head and beard was later crafted
  • Japan’s proposal to loan the artefact to a Chinese temple comes ahead of the nations’ 50th anniversary of ties, but observers are mixed about its impact amid recent diplomatic tensions

Topic |   China-Japan relations
A wooden statue of Zen master Yinyuan Longqi, known as Ingen in Japan. Photo: Courtesy of Obaku-san Manpuku-ji in Kyoto Prefecture/Kyodo
A wooden statue of Zen master Yinyuan Longqi, known as Ingen in Japan. Photo: Courtesy of Obaku-san Manpuku-ji in Kyoto Prefecture/Kyodo
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