Tetsuya Yamagami, (bottom), accused of assassinating former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe, is detained in Nara, Japan. File photo: via AP
Tetsuya Yamagami, (bottom), accused of assassinating former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe, is detained in Nara, Japan. File photo: via AP
Japan

In Japan, concerns rise over ‘too powerful police’ after post-Abe VIP security reforms

  • Authorities aim to increase training for close-protection officers, implement stronger security and give national police more control
  • But analysts say it may be harder for politicians to interact with public and police may be able to monitor anyone, affecting legal right to privacy

Tetsuya Yamagami, (bottom), accused of assassinating former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe, is detained in Nara, Japan. File photo: via AP
Tetsuya Yamagami, (bottom), accused of assassinating former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe, is detained in Nara, Japan. File photo: via AP
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