K-pop group TXT proves their songwriting chops on 'The Dream Chapter: Eternity'

Published: 
  • It doesn't have as much variety as its predecessors, but it shows consistency 
  • TXT is finally breaking out of its shell while still staying true to pop sensibilities 
Chris Gillett |
Published: 
Comment

Latest Articles

Hong Kong children ‘rejected by some popular British schools’ as enrolments hit record high

Siu Mai, teen contestant on ViuTV show, discusses her King Maker journey

Hot Topics: Why are green groups wary of MTR’s Northern Link line?

With the first two instalments of The Dream Chapter topping Asian charts, TXT’s third mini-album is surely headed for similar greatness. In The Dream Chapter: Eternity, the popular K-pop five-piece delivers another solid, varied set of songs to sing along to.

Drama gets things pumping with upbeat, hard-hitting house piano chords, propulsive beats and some funky guitar to add even more groove to this feel-good floor-filler. It’s a solid foundation, but the track really comes to life when the chorus hits with a sweeping, held-out, infectious falsetto cry of “Woohoo!”. 

The rest of the record is a lot more subdued in comparison. Fairy of Shampoo is incredibly laid-back with its easy-going groove, smooth trumpet solos, gentle picking guitars, and light, harmonised background “oohs”. Maze in the Mirror centres around a simple summery guitar chord progression, staying largely acoustic with soft, breathy vocals until the almost-cheesy final ballad of a chorus. 

Can’t You See Me features an muted, watery atmosphere, too, but there is a much more serious tone to the boys’ singing and lyrics, as they blast out, “Can’t you see me?/Friends don’t understand me, understand me anymore.”

NCT Dream's 'Reload' goes back to the basics 

Puma really sticks out stylistically from the rest, where instead of taking turns singing, they club together for a swagger-fuelled hard-trap banger. It really shows TXT breaking out of the shell of the more tender songs preceding it, while still retaining their pop sensibilities.

Eternity might not have as much variety as its predecessors, but the consistency in their songwriting shows they’re going to be sticking around for a long time.

Comment