Retired Hong Kong Police officer who struck a bystander during Occupy protests loses appeal and returns to prison

South China Morning Post

The case was the second time officers were found guilty of using excessive force while policing the 79-day pro-democracy protests

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Frankly Chu was found guilty of assault occasioning actual bodily harm, an offence punishable by three years’ imprisonment.

A retired senior police officer jailed for striking a bystander with a baton during Hong Kong’s 2014 Occupy protests was ordered to return to prison after losing his appeal on Friday.

Frankly Chu, 58, had appealed against both his conviction and sentence before Mr Justice Albert Wong Sung-hau, arguing at the High Court that his trial had been a circus.

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The former superintendent was jailed by a magistrate for three months in January for striking Osman Cheng Chung-hang, 28, with a baton during a clearance operation in Mong Kok on November 26, 2014.

Chu was remanded in custody for two weeks after being found guilty of assault occasioning actual bodily harm, an offence punishable by three years’ imprisonment.

Chu hit Osman Cheng with a baton during a clearance operation in Mong Kok.

But he was released on HK$50,000 bail immediately after sentencing, pending the appeal.

The case was the second time that a court had found officers guilty of using excessive force while policing the 79-day protests, which shut down major roads as protesters called for greater democracy. In February last year, seven police officers were jailed for two years on the same charge for punching and kicking an activist who poured liquid over their colleagues. Their appeal will be heard in November.

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