Hong Kong's public radio station replaces BBC with Chinese state-run programming

Agence France-Presse

China National Radio Hong Kong Edition takes over BBC World Service broadcast slot on Channel 6, amidst concerns over growing Beijing influence

Agence France-Presse |

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China National Radio Hong Kong Edition began broadcasting on Channel 6 on Monday.

Hong Kong’s public radio station has replaced its 24-hour BBC World Service broadcast with Chinese state-run programming, in a move the British broadcaster called “disappointing” as concerns grow over Beijing’s influence on the semi-autonomous city.

Listeners woke up on Monday morning to the Putonghua-language broadcast of the China National Radio Hong Kong Edition (CNR), instead of the World Service, which had been played live by RTHK since 1978.

The BBC said it was “always disappointed when a service our listeners are used to changes” with listeners launching a petition to bring back the World Service.

RTHK has a number of different channels offering some programmes in English. The World Service was broadcast on Channel 6, which is now playing CNR.

The CNR broadcast includes news, culture and lifestyle programming mostly in Putonghua.

Only some of its content is in Cantonese, which is the most widely-used language of Hong Kong, leading to criticism that this was another step towards the “mainlandisation” of Hong Kong.

RTHK is still running a reduced version of the World Service on a different channel, but only late at night, from 11pm to 7am.

China stands accused of tightening its grip on Hong Kong, with critics also blaming the pro-Beijing local government for acting as a puppet.

The jailing of prominent young pro-democracy activists last month and the unveiling of a controversial rail link to the mainland that would see a portion of the city come under Chinese law have worsened fears the city’s cherished freedoms are being eroded.

An online petition against the change to the World Service programming had received over 1,000 signatures by Tuesday morning.

“The removal of the BBC World Service from the airwaves makes the city feel more parochial and inward-looking,” the petition said.

RTHK’s head of corporate communications Amen Ng told AFP Tuesday that it was a “difficult decision” due to “limited radio frequency”.

She described the CNR broadcast as “tailor-made” for Hong Kong.

“This is a cultural exchange between mainland China and Hong Kong,” Ng added.