Hongkonger hospitalised and quarantined after returning from site of mysterious pneumonia outbreak in China

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South China Morning Post

Woman admitted to Tuen Mun Hospital displayed symptoms of upper respiratory infection; she tested negative for Sars and influenza

South China Morning Post |
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The woman was admitted to Tuen Mun Hospital on Tuesday.

A woman has been quarantined in a Hong Kong hospital after displaying symptoms of upper respiratory infection, following a trip to Wuhan where a mysterious outbreak of viral pneumonia has occurred.

The Hospital Authority confirmed on Thursday that the Hong Kong woman, who is currently stable, had been admitted to Tuen Mun Hospital on New Year’s Eve.

“As the patient said she had been to Wuhan before developing symptoms, Tuen Mun Hospital immediately arranged for that patient to stay in an isolation ward for treatment,” a spokesman for the authority said.

Hong Kong monitoring Sars-like flu outbreak in mainland China

A source from the authority quoted the woman as saying she had not been to Huanan seafood market, where most of the unidentified viral pneumonia cases in Wuhan had originated.

Hong Kong health authorities recently stepped up border screening and put hospitals on alert following the outbreak in the central Chinese city, warning of symptoms similar to Sars and bird flu.

Samples of the Hong Kong patient have been sent to the Department of Health for further testing. The case has also been reported to the department’s Centre for Health Protection for follow-up.

The department said initial testing by its Public Health Laboratory Services Branch found that the woman tested negative for the severe acute respiratory syndrome, more commonly known as Sars, which caused an outbreak in Hong Kong in 2003, influenza and bird flu.

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