Hongkongers can ditch the Christmas jumper as Observatory predicts warm December 25

YP ReporterJoy Lee

Temperatures are expected to reach a maximum of 22 degrees Celsius

YP ReporterJoy Lee |
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We can expect a warm Christmas (and sweaty Santas!) this year.

You won’t need your hat and scarf this weekend as it looks set to be a warm Christmas this year – one of the hottest on record – says the Observatory.

Scientific officer for the Observatory, Tsoi Tze-shun, told Young Post the warm weather will continue from tomorrow until Monday, with temperatures ranging from 19 to 22 degrees Celsius.

But if you think it won’t be chilly enough to enjoy some hot cocoa, think again. On Wednesday, lows of 12 degrees are expected, with the temperature not exceeding 15 degrees.

“After Boxing Day, the temperature will drop significantly due to stronger winds,” said Tsoi.

The warm weather is the result of a monsoon on the mainland. A monsoon isn’t actually a single storm. A monsoon is a wind that blows from cold to warm regions and causes seasonal changes in the direction of the strongest winds; which in turn affects the weather. In the summer, this is what causes heavy rainfall. In the winter, this is what causes dry conditions.

Chan said the maximum temperature of 22 degrees on Sunday would mean it ranks as the 15th to 20th warmest Christmas Day on record.

“Over the weekend, the northeast monsoon will gradually be weakening, so temperatures will rise tomorrow and Boxing Day. It won’t be very cold on Christmas Day, but the wind will be quite strong and so I would advise people to wear a thin windbreaker,” said Tsoi.

Rain is also expected over the Christmas period. The humidity will drop from 95 per cent on Christmas Eve to 80 per cent on Boxing Day.

Edited by Lucy Christie

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