Occupy was a movement, not a revolution

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By Stephen Tang, Co-panel Head of the English Department, Coordinator of the English Centre of CCC Hoh Fuk Tong College
By Stephen Tang, Co-panel Head of the English Department, Coordinator of the English Centre of CCC Hoh Fuk Tong College |
Published: 
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Protesters gather in Admiralty during a heavy rain storm on September 30.

With the Occupy protests now over, it is worth looking back at what they achieved. Occupy has been a mix of patience, peace, enthusiasm, tear gas, anger, batons and even bloodshed. I felt relieved when it finally ended with peace and restraint.

I found it interesting that throughout the past few weeks, the term "umbrella revolution" was used to describe the protests. Personally, I prefer to use the term "umbrella movement". "Movement" suggests a large group of people working together to achieve something positive. But "revolution" suggests the complete overthrow of a political system.

We cannot deny that Hong Kong is a part of China. Hong Kong was not even an independent country before 1997. Using the term "revolution" suggests the protesters were trying to overthrow Chinese rule. But really they were looking for better political reform within the system - universal suffrage.

Every citizen in Hong Kong, including scholars and political leaders, understand that a full revolution is not a realistic aim, at least in the next few decades.

Instead let's start focusing on what can be achieved through dialogue and negotiations.

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