Talking Points: do people post their New Year’s resolutions on social media because they really want to improve, or for the “likes”?

Hate it when you can’t talk back? Well, you can with Young Post. Have your say and share with students around Hong Kong

Jamie Lam |

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Charlotte Fong, 15, International Christian School

Like any other post, most people do it for the “likes” and bragging rights. New Year’s resolutions are personal goals you hope to achieve, so telling people about them won’t make things any easier.

People often post incredibly personal things, such as messages directed to a specific person, on their social media pages. Although they might genuinely want to share their experiences with friends, they often come across as desperate for sympathy and recognition through “likes”.

In society today, self-worth is directly linked to the number of “likes” you receive on social media, which is indeed a very sad fact.

Pauline Wong, 16, Maryknoll Convent School

I’m sure everyone has resolutions or targets they want to accomplish in the new year. They all want to improve, but whether they can do so depends on their resilience.

Even though they could be putting their New Year’s resolutions on social media for the “likes”, I don’t think that’s the only reason. It would be like announcing your goals to the entire world, so you would try to achieve them for the sake of saving face. For example, if someone pledges not to eat junk food for a month, they would think: “Everyone knows about this resolution, I can’t mess it up.”

So if they really manage to keep their resolution, it would bring great satisfaction, and something to boast about on social media.

Ally Chan, 16, Baptist Lui Ming Choi Secondary School

At the end of a year, you might hear many people say that they have failed to keep their resolutions. But posting New Year’s resolutions online can help you keep track of your goals and keep improving.

Also, you may be motivated by netizens who have similar targets. A good example is blogs, where students post pictures of them studying. This is a new way to boost their confidence, so maybe all those posts about New Year’s resolutions are a result of people’s hopes for real improvement.

Hemant Bharwaney, 15, Renaissance College

It really depends on the person and the situation. Some people might post their New Year’s resolutions on social media as a form of validation, because they may not be disciplined enough to keep track of their own progress. By sharing one’s resolutions on social media, “outsiders” become aware of them, which in turn makes one more likely to achieve their targets.

Also, people may post their New Year’s resolutions on social media seeking encouragement. This could help those who lack motivation or self-esteem to keep their resolutions.

Overall, although it seems like people are just clamouring for “likes” when they post their New Year’s resolutions on social media, it can be very beneficial in achieving your goals.

Angelina Wang, 16, Chinese International School

People post their New Year’s resolutions on social media to improve themselves, as well as for the “likes”. And there’s nothing wrong with that! Posting on social media makes it feel more official: the internet will now hold you accountable for keeping your word, and encouraging words can make you feel good when you’re working towards your goals. There’s also the added bonus of someone seeing your post and feeling motivated to work towards their resolutions, too!

In our next Talking Points, we'll discuss:

Should the Hong Kong government spend millions of dollars on the New Year’s Eve fireworks display?

We are now accepting your answers for this topic. To take part, email your answer with your name, age, and school, along with a nice, clear selfie (make sure it’s not blurry), to [email protected] by lunchtime on Monday. Don’t forget to include “Talking Points” in the subject line.

Edited by M. J. Premaratne