Haining Liu

Haining Liu lives in Beijing and considers herself a lifelong journalist and aspiring writer. In reality, she pays her rent by providing communications strategies for clients who want to tell good stories. Haining read public policy at St Hugh’s College, University of Oxford. She is a clumsy amateur ballet dancer.
Haining Liu
Haining Liu lives in Beijing and considers herself a lifelong journalist and aspiring writer. In reality, she pays her rent by providing communications strategies for clients who want to tell good stories. Haining read public policy at St Hugh’s College, University of Oxford. She is a clumsy amateur ballet dancer.

Latest from Haining Liu

Enjoying Christmas doesn’t make you any less Chinese
China’s online shopping frenzy is no panacea for the clear air and water we really need for survival
Opinion | Amid pain and sometimes fury, China’s mega hospitals need to get back to basics

Crowds, noise, frustration and hostility are the reality in the country’s health care institutions.

27 Oct 2018 - 7:30PM

Crowds, noise, frustration and hostility are the reality in the country’s health care institutions.

Amid pain and sometimes fury, China’s mega hospitals need to get back to basics
Opinion | What the popularity of a Qing dynasty drama, The Story of Yanxi Palace, says about China’s appetite for feminism

Underlying the runaway success of the Chinese series The Story of Yanxi Palace are regressive and patriarchal attitudes to women that persist even in the aftermath of China’s #MeToo movement.

19 Sep 2018 - 10:07AM

Underlying the runaway success of the Chinese series The Story of Yanxi Palace are regressive and patriarchal attitudes to women that persist even in the aftermath of China’s #MeToo movement.

What the popularity of a Qing dynasty drama, The Story of Yanxi Palace, says about China’s appetite for feminism
Opinion | Even if China switches to a three-child policy, it shouldn’t force women to have more babies

China is desperate to defuse a demographic time bomb, as the labour force shrinks and the national pension plan is stretched thin. But the state shouldn’t be pressuring women into motherhood.

28 Aug 2018 - 8:15PM

China is desperate to defuse a demographic time bomb, as the labour force shrinks and the national pension plan is stretched thin. But the state shouldn’t be pressuring women into motherhood.

Even if China switches to a three-child policy, it shouldn’t force women to have more babies